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Christian Magallanes Moody

Fiction Writer

Hello. I am a fiction writer who likes strange and magical worlds.

My publications include stories in Esquire, Alaska Quarterly Review, The Cincinnati Review, the Best New American Voices anthology, and the Best American Fantasy anthology, among others. I've also published poems in Indiana Review and Sonora Review, and my nonfiction was a finalist in the DIAGRAM essay contest.

I hold an MFA in Creative Writing from Syracuse University and a PhD in English (with a fiction concentration) from the University of Cincinnati. I've been in residence at the Yaddo Artist Colony and was selected as the 2014 Sarabande Books Writer-in-Residence at Bernheim Forest. In 2015 I was awarded the Al Smith Fellowship from the Kentucky Arts Council and I've also received fellowships from the Saltonstall Foundation for the Arts, the Charles Taft Center for the Humanities, along with many others.

Currently, I am an Assistant Professor of English at the Cleveland Institute of Art and live with my family in Indianapolis.

 

Contact

My AGENT

Renée Zuckerbrot
Massie & McQuilkin
27 West 20th Street, #305
New York, NY 10011
renee@mmqlit.com
 

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Genres


FICTION

I am primarily a fiction writer, reader, and teacher. My PhD was focused on fiction writing and my first book-length publication is a story collection. Some of my favorite writers are Kelly Link, Karen Russell, Jeff Vandermeer, and Carmen Maria Machado.



NONFICTION

At Syracuse, I studied nonfiction and poetry with Mary Karr.  I wrote the first hundred pages of a memoir that explored my ancestry, rooted in Guadalajara, and my great-uncle's service during WWII in the little-known Mexican Air Force. 



TEXT + IMAGE

Comics, graphic narratives, and other combinations of text and image are favorite forms of mine. I love a range of illustrated books, from Alison Bechdel's Fun Home to Emily Carroll's Through the Woods and Isabel Greenberg's Encyclopedia of Early Earth.


 
Sometimes it is safer to
read maps with your feet.
— Kelly Link